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Binfield Badger Group

Badgers and Developers

Badgers are protected by law. The Badger Act of 1992 was introduced to protect setts and their occupants. The large territory is not directly protected by the Badger Act, but any development or activity that is close to a sett must not disturb or harm badgers. If a development is being considered close to a sett, the developer must obtain a licence to do the work in a very controlled way, which must be monitored by a suitably qualified wildlife expert.

For more detailed information please refer to Natural England


Binfield Badger Group

The Group is a registered Charity and its objective is to promote awareness of wildlife conservation. It does this by producing newsletters, holding regular meetings, attending many local events and giving talks to schools and other societies in Binfield and the surrounding area.  Its members have access to two hides at an active sett in Binfield, from which badgers can be observed throughout the year. The Group also monitors badger activity at a number of setts in the County and liaises with Councils on any proposals which may have an impact on badgers and their habitat. The Group is frequently asked to provide expert advice on the activity level at setts that may be impacted by developments. Surveys can be time consuming and the Group relies on local people to help detail sightings of badgers and any activity near setts. The more detailed and accurate the information is that can be provided to the local Council, the more likely that the wildlife can be protected. For more information on Badgers and the Binfield Badger Group, please visit www.binfieldbadgers.org.uk where you will also be able to find contact details for the Group and other wildlife organisations across the UK.

About Badgers

There are approximately 300,000 badgers in the United Kingdom. This may seem like a large number, but an estimated 47,500 are killed in road accidents every year. Combined with the persecution of badgers by people who believe that killing them is a sport and the reduction of suitable habitat by developers, you may see why the badger is an endangered species in many parts of the UK.

Badgers’ setts are found in areas which provide shelter, security and an adequate food supply, especially deciduous woodland near pasture. Their main food is the earthworm, but badgers will take whatever is available, such as fruit, insects, cereals, and grubs. The central point of any badger territory is the main sett, which consists of a series of tunnels and chambers. Sett identification can be difficult, but there are several distinguishing features provide shelter, security and an adequate food supply, especially deciduous woodland near pasture. Their main food is the earthworm, but badgers will take whatever is available, such as fruit, insects, cereals, and grubs. The central point of any badger territory is the main sett, which consists of a series of tunnels and chambers. Sett identification can be difficult, but there are several distinguishing features;


A typical badger territory may be from 40 to 180 hectares in size and may house from 2 to over 15 animals. The size of the social group depends largely upon the amount of food available.

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